My Blog

Posts for: March, 2017

By Chattanooga Periodontics & Dental Implants
March 30, 2017
Category: Oral Health
GetaDentalExamasSoonasPossibleifyouSuspectGumDisease

If you suspect you have periodontal (gum) disease, it's important to get a correct diagnosis and begin treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you begin treatment the better the long-term outcome.

Gum disease is a bacterial infection that's most often triggered by plaque, a thin film of food particles on tooth surfaces. Plaque buildup most often occurs when a person doesn't practice effective oral hygiene: daily brushing and flossing and professional cleanings at least twice a year.

The most common type of gum disease, gingivitis, can begin within days of not brushing and flossing. It won't always show itself, but you can have symptoms like swollen, red or bleeding gums, as well as bad taste and breath. You could also develop painful abscesses, which are localized pockets of infection within the gums.

If we don't stop the disease it will eventually weaken the gum attachment to the teeth, bone loss will occur and form deep pockets of infection between the teeth and bone. There's only one way to stop it: remove the offending plaque from all tooth surfaces, particularly below the gum line.

We usually remove plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) manually with special hand instruments called scalers. If the plaque and calculus have extended deeper, we may need to perform another procedure called root planing in which we shave or “plane” the plaque and calculus (tartar) from the root surfaces.

In many cases of early gum disease, your family dentist can perform plaque removal. If, however, your gum disease is more extensive, they may refer you to a periodontist, a specialist in the treatment and care of gums. Periodontists are trained and experienced in treating a full range of gum infections with advanced techniques, including gum surgery.

You can also see a periodontist on your own for treatment or for a second opinion — you don't necessarily need a referral order. If you have a systemic disease like diabetes it's highly advisable you see a periodontist first if you suspect gum disease.

If you think you might have gum disease, don't wait: the longer you do the more advanced and destructive the disease can become. Getting an early start on treatment is the best way to keep the treatment simple and keep gum disease from causing major harm to your teeth and gums.

If you would like more information on the diagnosis and treatment of gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “When to See a Periodontist.”


By CHATTANOOGA PERIODONTICS & DENTAL IMPLANTS
March 15, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  

Gum disease, or periodontitis, is caused by a sticky film of bacteria called plaque. Plaque is always forming on your teeth, but if your gum diseaseteeth aren’t cleaned well, the bacteria in plaque can cause your gums to become inflamed. When this happens, your gums will pull away from your teeth and form spaces called pockets. Plaque then gets trapped in these pockets and cannot be removed with regular brushing.  Plaque then hardens and becomes tartar, or calculus.  Plaque and calculus create a perfect home for bacteria to thrive  and cause periodontal disease.  Scaling and root planing remove plaque and calculus from the teeth and creates a healthy oral environment. 
 
Fortunately, when treated early, periodontal disease can be stopped so that it does not progress and become more severe.  If periodontal disease is left untreated, tooth mobility, bone loss, and tooth loss can occur.  Scaling and root planing is an effective method for stopping the spread of periodontal disease.  This treatment can be performed by Dr. Charles Felts, Dr. Elizabeth Randall, and their hygienists at Chattanooga Periodontics and Dental Implants.
 
Scaling and root planing may take more than one appointment to complete, and a local anesthetic is often used to minimize any discomfort. This treatment can be compared to having an irritating splinter removed from an infected finger. The procedure involves thoroughly scaling all plaque, bacteria and calculus deposits from your teeth and root surfaces. Root planing smoothes all rough areas on the root surfaces. Smooth root surfaces keep bacteria, plaque, and tartar from re-adhering underneath the gumline, which will allow your gums to heal and reattach themselves more firmly.
 
If your gums are inflamed, show signs of pulling away from the teeth, or bleed after brushing or eating, you may have periodontal disease.  The non-surgical treatment of scaling and root planing is an effective, minimally invasive therapy that will aid in stopping the progression of periodontal disease.  When followed by regular dental visits and good oral hygiene habits,  your oral health can be greatly improved. 
 
For treatment of periodontal disease in Chattanooga, TN, visit Chattanooga Periodontics and Dental Implants.  To schedule an appointment with Dr. Felts or Dr. Randall, call (423) 756-2450.
 


By Chattanooga Periodontics & Dental Implants
March 15, 2017
Category: Oral Health
DrTravisStorkDontIgnoreBleedingGums

Are bleeding gums something you should be concerned about? Dear Doctor magazine recently posed that question to Dr. Travis Stork, an emergency room physician and host of the syndicated TV show The Doctors. He answered with two questions of his own: “If you started bleeding from your eyeball, would you seek medical attention?” Needless to say, most everyone would. “So,” he asked, “why is it that when we bleed all the time when we floss that we think it’s no big deal?” As it turns out, that’s an excellent question — and one that’s often misunderstood.

First of all, let’s clarify what we mean by “bleeding all the time.” As many as 90 percent of people occasionally experience bleeding gums when they clean their teeth — particularly if they don’t do it often, or are just starting a flossing routine. But if your gums bleed regularly when you brush or floss, it almost certainly means there’s a problem. Many think bleeding gums is a sign they are brushing too hard; this is possible, but unlikely. It’s much more probable that irritated and bleeding gums are a sign of periodontal (gum) disease.

How common is this malady? According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, nearly half of all  Americans over age 30 have mild, moderate or severe gum disease — and that number increases to 70.1 percent for those over 65! Periodontal disease can occur when a bacteria-rich biofilm in the mouth (also called plaque) is allowed to build up on tooth and gum surfaces. Plaque causes the gums to become inflamed, as the immune system responds to the bacteria. Eventually, this can cause gum tissue to pull away from the teeth, forming bacteria-filled “pockets” under the gum surface. If left untreated, it can lead to more serious infection, and even tooth loss.

What should you do if your gums bleed regularly when brushing or flossing? The first step is to come in for a thorough examination. In combination with a regular oral exam (and possibly x-rays or other diagnostic tests), a simple (and painless) instrument called a periodontal probe can be used to determine how far any periodontal disease may have progressed. Armed with this information, we can determine the most effective way to fight the battle against gum disease.

Above all, don’t wait too long to come in for an exam! As Dr. Stork notes, bleeding gums are “a sign that things aren’t quite right.”  If you would like more information about bleeding gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bleeding Gums.” You can read the entire interview with Dr. Travis Stork in Dear Doctor magazine.